Education for Democracy — A Moral Task of Schools in a Democracy

by Georg Lind[1]

Among the ideals guiding education the moral ideal of democratic living together is the most central, but also the most difficult to achieve. Teachers, parents and students ask themselves how the contradiction between the democratic promise of freedom and the autocratic self-understan­ding of traditional education can be overcome. How can young people be educated to become mature and responsible democrats when the educational methods hold them back in a state of immaturity? How can they be encouraged to think for themselves and to question existing norms and expectations without turning them into anarchistic rebels or libertarian individualists who see in fundamental democratic values such as fairness and solidarity only a restriction of their own self-realization or economic success?

For Socrates the main task of education was to question the existing order, including educati­on itself. Can virtue be taught? What does it even mean?  All men desire the good, but they mostly lack the power to attain it. Is it not better for education, therefore, to promote the powers of attain­ment rather than concentrating on values and desires?

Socrates believed that education gives no answers, but can only ask questions. The govern­ment of Athens at the time saw in this kind of education incitement to rebellion and anarchy and a threat to society; it condemned him to death although he by no means questioned everything. When friends offered to help him flee he turned the offer down. His justification provides a powerful moral message. By fleeing, he argues, he would question law and order, to which he had always been committed.

Socrates himself possibly recognized the danger lying behind his questions if they were pre­sented to citizens who had not yet developed powers of independent thinking. In their case, as Hannah Arendt (2007) remarked with reference to Socrates, critical questions could lead to a rejection of existing norms without their being replaced by personal, inner norms, by true mora­lity.

However, such a process places high demands on moral-democratic competence. It calls for the ability of every individual to solve the problems and conflicts that inevitably arise when orienting personal behavior on moral principles, without recourse to violence, deceit or subjection to others, to whom the burden of responsibility (and hence also the power) is transferred.

As the Indian-American philosopher Amartya Sen (1990) has ascertained, it is things which seem so simple, such as speaking and listening, which first enable democratic, self-governing life together. In a democracy, according to Sen, every citizen must be in a position to speak with and listen to others when important issues are at stake. Similarly, Darling-Hammond and Ancess (1996) assert that the “citizens must have the knowledge and skills to be able to intelligently debate and decide among competing conceptions, to weigh the individual and the common good, if they are to sustain democratic ideals throughout the complex challenges all societies face. (p. 154) Many people lack this competence, as Socrates already pointed out and as our studies reveal, because they obviously have too few opportunities to develop it. (Lind 2002; 2016)

It is, above all, the task of the schools to provide the opportunities for the development of democratic competence by means of both general education and specific education for democracy.

 

The democratic purpose of general education

How important the general education of all citizens is for the creation and maintenance of demo­cracy was demonstrated, above all, by Thomas Jefferson, the co-author of the American Decla­ra­tion of Independence: “This last is the most certain and the most legitimate engine of government. Educate and inform the whole mass of the people, enable them to see that it is their interest to preserve peace and order, and they will preserve it, and it requires no very high degree of edu­cation to convince them of this. They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.” (Jefferson 1940)

The French political theorist Alexis de Tocqueville, who travelled extensively in the then still young “Democracy in America” and analyzed his impressions in a book published in 1835, saw education as the third pillar of democracy alongside the separation of powers and civil commit­ment. He recommended that the government should spend all the money it could afford on edu­cation as this is the only way of preventing democracy from turning into a dictatorship. “Suffrage without schooling produces mobocracy, not democracy” (Adler 1982, p. 3) For researchers on democracy such as Benjamin Barber (1992) education and democracy are “education and demo­cracy are inextricably linked”. (p.9)

The insight of Jefferson, de Tocqueville, Adler and Barber that education primarily serves to enable people to govern themselves and hence to prevent racism, nationalism, civil war and dicta­torship, shaped educational policy in the young Federal Republic after the collapse of the Nazi regime. As education in the interest of the democratic community it should be available to all citizens free of charge. The public education system has turned out to be an important, perhaps the most important pillar of our democracy.

 

The revaluation of education

Today it seems that this insight is being increasingly lost. The more the horrors of the Nazi dicta­torship fade from sight, the more the democratic duty to provide education is converted into an individual right to prepare for a career. The democratic educational task of the school is often not even mentioned nowadays in discussions on the maintenance of democracy. Education is often seen as being only indirectly important for the preservation of democracy as it helps to increase economic performance. Consequently the quality of education is no longer measured by its con­tribution to democratic living together but by the (supposed) requirements of the economy.

As a result of this revaluation the task of education is now frequently seen in promoting the reading skills, mathematical competence and factual knowledge of our children. A glance at developments in the USA shows where this leads to. The assessment of the value of teaching in terms of testable knowledge of facts instead of the development of the students’ capacity to think and discuss started there more than fifty years ago. In the meantime test scores form the basis for the evaluation of students, teachers and schools, so that teaching is increasingly devoted to meet­ing the requirements of the test industry instead of promoting the needs of democracy. Learning in schools is more and more restricted to those areas that can be tested and sanctioned by means of simple tests. (“teaching to the test”).

The intensive use of “high stakes” tests associated with hard sanctions for students and schools (Ravitch 2010; Koretz 2017) and the privatization of schools threaten democracy as a way of life (Dewey) without bringing any recognizable benefit to the economy (Berliner & Glass 2014). The fifty-year long-rule of these hifg-stakes tests has not even led to an improvement in test perfor­mance (Lind 2009).

The fear-instilling tests that have to be worked on under extreme time-pressure massively ob­struct the thinking and discussion needed for the development of moral-democratic compe­tence. These tests apodictically lay down what is right and what is wrong. They permit no questions and no criticisms and they leave no time for reflection. Taking a math task from the PISA tests Sjoberg (2007) shows how “unrealistic and flawed” many of the test questions are. “Students who simply insert numbers in the formula without thinking will get it right. More critical students who start thinking will, however, be confused and get in trouble!” (p. 217) These tests also do not per­mit discussions between students and teachers as is possible in good lessons.

The more these tests determine the lives of the children, the more the opportunities disappear which would enable them to use their moral competence, and the more their moral development suffers. Someone who is not allowed to learn how to solve problems through reflection and dis­cus­sion can only have recourse to violence and deception. Someone who cannot experience the solution of conflicts through dialogue will regard other people with suspicion and attempt to protect himself by acquiring material goods and by subjection to leaders who promise to take a tough line on dissidents and to abolish democracy (Adorno et al. 1950).

If moral competence is the ability to judge and act in accordance with inner moral principles (Kohlberg 1964), then democratic competence is its extension to discursive debates with others. It is the ability to solve problems not only through reflection but also through discussion with others instead of resorting to violence, deceit or submission to others.

As psychological studies (partly of an experimental kind) have shown, there is in fact a causal relationship between restricted democratic competence and obedience to authorities, violence, deceit, breach of contract, the covering-up of criminal acts, omission of help, lack of decision, drug abuse, and even with poor learning performance, bad school grades in academic subjects and, finally, with slight commitment to basic democratic values (for source references see Hem­merling 2014; Kohlberg 1984; Lind 2016).

 

The task of education for democracy

How can education for democracy oppose these social developments? Can it become the key to the maintenance and reinforcement of democracy?

Democratic competence is inborn, but it only develops fully by use, that is to say its develop­ment depends on our finding opportunities which present a challenge to our abilities but do not overstrain them. Many children find few such learning opportunities in the environment in which they grow up (Lind 2006). Parents provide their children with such opportunities in as far as they are able and have the necessary time. This is more often the case with parents who have them­selves enjoyed a good education (Speicher 1994). Consequently, for most children, the develop­ment of moral competence depends on assistance in school.

This assistance is evidently provided by many schools and teachers, although to this day the “subject” is not offered in teacher training or the school curriculum. The extent and quality of school education is by far the strongest factor in the development of moral competence. There are occasional reports on connections with social class, cultural background and gender, but these are clearly of slighter significance and often disappear when the share of education in the connection is factored out (Lind 2002).

In view of the great challenges of the present time (such as social inequality, technical change, immigration, inclusion of the handicapped, environmental pollution, the extinction of species, armed conflict, terrorism, xenophobia and drug addiction) the opportunities for moral develop­ment provided by schools today are insufficient and unsustainable. They are insufficient because they depend on the individual initiative of teachers and on the free spaces left to them by the pressure to achieve higher grades and by school supervision. At the end of their school careers far too many students have not achieved even the minimum of moral competence necessary to solve problems and conflicts in everyday life by reflection and discussion.

Moral education in our schools is also not sustainable because many students fail to achieve the degree of moral competence they need if they are later to find learning opportunities on their own, without school, and hence to develop further. People with low moral competence do not see many decision situations as opportunities for learning, but as threatening and overwhelming. How­­ever, the failure to take advantage of such opportunities leads to a stunting of their moral competence. This regression phenomenon can be found in almost all children who have enjoyed less than 12 years of school education (Lind 2002). Among adults regressions in moral compe­tence occur when their situation provides too few opportunities to use it, as is often the case with prisoners (Hemmerling 2014) or even with students of medicine (Schillinger 2006).

As moral research has shown, schools must not necessarily do more in order to improve the moral competence of all students sufficiently and sustainably. But they must be more purposeful in their approach, that is to say they must work with better methods and with better trained teachers.

 

Which methods?

Hardly any of the methods prevailing in schools today meet the challenge of providing effective education for democracy:

Institutional studies: We were hitherto of the opinion that for the maintenance of democracy it is sufficient to convey knowledge of democracy, to acquaint young people with the Basic Law and the institutions of the state. The mediation of this knowledge could give young people the opportunity to weigh up the pros and cons of individual good and social good and to discuss com­peting ideas on the meaning of basic democratic principles such as justice, freedom and solidarity. But teachers often fail to take advantage of this opportunity in their lessons because the pressures of testing and grading leave too little time or because the teacher lacks the confidence to deal with reflection and discussion in the classroom (Lind 2016).

Communication of values, ethics lessons. For democracy to flourish citizens must desire it and attribute great value to ideals such as freedom, justice and cooperation. In fact this ideal is highly esteemed by most people in the world (Sen 1996; McFaul 2004) even when they are disappointed by real existing democracy and themselves often fail to live up to their own ideals. The mediation of values by the school is hence not only superfluous. It is a “performative self-contradiction” (Karl-Otto Apel) to the ideal of democratic freedom (Lind 2017b). Moreover, the theoretical media­tion of values in the form of lectures or reading text shows no empirically demonstrable effect on the development of moral competence (Narvaez 2001; Lind 2002).

Living democracy: The method of “living democracy” is only limitedly suitable as a means of promoting moral competence. On the one hand, the learning opportunities it offers are only avail­able to a small proportion of young people, and mostly only to those who already have a relatively high degree of moral competence and are not overtaxed by this method (Comunian & Gielen 2006). On the other hand the effectiveness of “living democracy” is highly dependent on the quality of the “democracy” the students experience and the accompanying pedagogical program (Westheimer 2015). Even the Just Community schools, which practice democratic procedures in an exemplary manner, cannot promote the moral competence of students effectively. On balance the JC projects in the USA brought no developmental gain for the participants (Power et al. 1998; Lind 2002). In the project “Democracy and Education in Schools” in Germany there was a clear learning effect (Lind & Althof 1992), but this cannot be unequivo­cally attributed to the method of “living democracy”, as the students also participated at the same time in many dilemma discus­sions, whose teaching effectiveness has been clearly demon­strated (Lind 2002; 2016). Positive effects of free discussion and genuine participation in democratic decision-making processes were incidentally revealed by the Konstanz longitudinal study of students from five European countries undertaken between 1977 and 1985 (see, e.g., Bargel et al. 1982; Lind 2002). Whereas in four countries only a low improvement in moral competence was established it increased strongly among students in Poland at the end of the 1970s, as many of them had the opportunity to parti­cipate in the democratic movement in their country at that time (Nowak & Lind 2009).

Dilemma discussion: This method of education for democracy developed by Moshe Blatt and Lawrence Kohlberg (1975) did in fact prove to be very effective as a means of stimulating the moral judgment competence of students (Lind 2002) but it was later abandoned as a failure by Kohlberg and his students because teachers did not accept it (Althof 2015). For Kohlberg (1964) moral judgment competence is the “capacity to make decisions and judgments which are moral (i.e., based on internal principles) and to act in accordance with such judgments.” (p. 425) In order to promote this competence the method requires the teacher to confront students with several dilemma discussions and then to present and justify their opinions. In order to maximize the teaching effect the teacher was called upon to offer the students arguments which lay exactly one stage above their developmental level (the so-called “plus 1 – convention”). To this end the teachers had to determine the students’ “level of moral judgment competence” before teaching (with the help of Kohlberg’s interview method). The effectiveness of the Blatt-Kohlberg method was subjected to more intensive empirical examination that any previous method of moral edu­cation. We found over 140 intervention studies which were undertaken between 1970 and 1984. The average effect size of the method was astoundingly high, amounting to r = 0.40 and d = 0.88, a value scarcely achieved by any previous pedagogical method (Lind 2002).

The reasons why teachers were not willing to adopt the Blatt-Kohlberg-Method in spite of its high effectiveness were manifold. It is very time-consuming, requires intensive training of the teachers and involves the carrying out of long interviews with the students, which can only be evaluated by experts. In addition, the interviews are subjective and intransparent for the teachers (Lind 1989). A further difficult problem lies in the need for the teacher to present arguments (plus-1-convention). This stands in contrast to Kohlberg’s own development theory, which calls for discovery learning instead of reproduction. An experiment by Lawrence Walker (1983) in fact shows that the arguments of the teacher have an effect not because the students simply reproduce them but because they stimulate the students to think for themselves. Counter-arguments pre­sent­ed by other students also achieve the same effect. The method could, therefore, be even more effective if the teachers took a back seat and left the students with more time for discussions with each other (Lind 2016).

 

Moral-democratic competence can and must be promoted by the schools

This experience with the Blatt-Kohlberg-method and the findings of moral-democratic psycho­logy at the end of the 1990s led to important new insights into the nature, measurability, rele­vance, development and teachability of morality, which pointed the way to a new approach to education for democracy (Lind 2002; 2016; 2017a; 2017b). We now know that for competent democratic behavior two different aspects of moral feeling are important. On the one hand there is the central aspect of orientation. Orientation on moral democratic principles such as justice, free­dom and cooperation is indispensable for moral behavior. However, we do not have to promote this orientation: it is inborn and deeply anchored in our emotions, so that it does not have to be conveyed to us by education. On the other hand there is the cognitive aspect of the ability to act in accordance with such orientations. Emotionally felt moral principles are powerful, but they are not sufficient for making the right decisions. They are mostly very indeterminate, can easily lead us astray and often bring us into dilemma situations in which every conceivable decision turns out to be morally wrong.

What we call moral-democratic competence or more simply moral competence is the ability to solve problems and conflicts on the basis of (felt) moral principals by means of thinking and dis­cus­sion with others and without recourse to violence, deceit or subjection to others (Lind 2016). We are scarcely aware of how high or low our moral competence is. The degree of moral compe­tence we possess cannot simply be assessed by enquiring about it. But it is shown in behavior. It is shown, for example, very clearly in discussions when participants judge the argu­ments of their supporters and opponents. Most people judge arguments according to their agreement (or dis­agree­ment) with their own. They find it difficult to judge them according to their moral quality, which is indispensable for democratic discourse (Habermas 1990). The degree to which people can judge the arguments of others regardless of their own opinions and according to their moral quality has proved to be a good indicator of moral competence (Keasey 1974; Lind 2016). Until recently it was not possible to do scientific research on the influence of this ability on our be­havior because suitable instruments were lacking. The existing objective instruments of measure­ment were inadequate for this purpose. They only enabled us to find out how well individual behavior fulfilled certain external social norms. But they did not allow us to ascertain how well it corresponded with the inner moral principles of the individual. With so-called qualitative methods such as Kohlberg’s clinical interview method it was possible to trace inner motives, but they were not objective enough to exclude subjective distortions of the data (Lind 1989).

The Moral Competence Tests (MCT) made it possible to measure moral orientation and com­petence both validly and objectively. By means of a special multivariate test design the MCT makes both aspects of the answering behavior visible and measurable. The MCT presents two dilemma stories and requires the participants in the test to judge a series of arguments for and against the decisions taken in the stories. The arguments are so chosen that each of them repre­­sents a certain moral orientation. The pattern of the answers to the MCT enable us to recognize whether and how far the interviewees are capable of judging arguments according to their moral quality instead of their agreement with personal opinions.

Research using Kohlberg’s interview method and the MCT consistently agree: a) that this ability is very unevenly distributed and is overall very weakly developed; b) that – as must be the case with abilities – it cannot be simulated upwards; and c) that it is causally related to a variety of behavioral forms and competencies which are relevant to democracy (see, among others, Kohl­berg 1984; Lind 2016). For example, moral competence determines to a high degree whether people observe the obligations of a contract, whether they are honest in examinations, whether they can solve the problems they have in life without resort to drugs, whether they can report a crime even though it is disadvantageous for themselves, whether they help people in need, whether they critically examine the directives of authorities, whether they can quickly find solutions in dilemma situations, whether they avoid violence to reach their political goals and whether they are actively committed to the maintenance of basic democratic rights. New studies further show that people with a high degree of moral competence can register facts better, get better grades in Math and German and have better average grades in their Abitur (high school diploma). Particularly important for living together in a democracy is the finding of Wasel ( 1994) that people assess the moral competence of others more precisely the higher their own moral competence is. In a certain sense it is, therefore, true to say that a people gets the government it “deserves.” But the reverse also seems to be true. If a democratic government neglects the edu­cation of its citizens it gets a people that desires more authority and less democracy.

Moral competence needs, therefore, to be developed by use, as our muscles do. Just as muscles only develop to the extent that they are used, so too moral competence only develops according to its use. In this context the number and the nature of the opportunities we find in our environment play a decisive role. There should be not too few, but not too many, not too simple, but not too difficult problems which test our moral competence. The optimal level shifts, as in other fields, with the increasing development of moral competence in the direction of greater challenges. From a certain stage of development onwards the individual is in a position to find suitable learning opportunities and to train his/her moral competence without outside assistance. In order to reach this level of development, however, most people are, as already mentioned, dependent upon a good and sufficiently long school education.

 

The Konstanz Method of Dilemma Discussion

On the basis of this knowledge I have developed the Konstanz Method of Dilemma Discussion (KMDD). It includes some elements of the Blatt-Kohlberg method, but differs substantially from it (Lind 2016; 2017a; Reinicke 2017). It has been used for over twenty years in a variety of edu­cational institutions: in schools from the third grade on, in vocational schools, in universities, in prisons and military academies. It has been employed in several countries apart from Germany, among others in China. It has proved highly effective. A single KMDD session already achieves a greater growth in moral competence than an entire school year. However, a thorough training of the teachers is a precondition for effective and responsible use of the KMDD. Without this train­ing there are no, or even negative, effects (Lind 2016).

We now also employ the KMDD in the public sphere as “Discussion Theater” (DT). The piece we put on stage is called “Talking and Listening”. First performances in the Dresden Frauenkirche and in Poznan, Poland, were well-attended and successful. They show that there is a need for serious, free discussion of sensitive topics with others that are carried out without accusations and aggression.

Although the KMDD and the DT are theater pieces with a story about decisions taken by a fictitious person, the story mostly has a factual basis or could have happened in the way presented. Above all the discussions between the supporters and opponents of the decision of the protagonist are real: the participants in the discussion theater, as in the KMDD, give their own opinions and attempt to convince their opponents of the rightness of their standpoint. The KMDD and the DT do not, therefore, involve role-playing; they present genuine debates in which emotions are noticeably present. Nonetheless, in the innumerable sessions I have led in more than twenty years there has never been a violation of the only inalterable rule, namely that everything can be said and that the arguments can be judged and criticized, but not the people involved in the discussion. Violation of the rule would not be sanctioned; the leader of the session would simply recall the rule. But this was never necessary either. It seems that everyone wishes for hard but fair discus­sions and that is enough for the session leader, as the perceived authority, to state the rule openly at the beginning and to promise to ensure its observation, but otherwise not to intervene in the course of the discussion (Lind 2016).

 

Conclusion

Self-determined living together in a democracy is not easy. It can only function if all citizens have sufficient opportunities as children to develop their moral competence. Only in this way can they be enabled to solve problems and conflicts in accordance with the rules of morality, that is, to say by reflection and discussion and not by resort to violence, deceit or subjection to others (Haber­mas 1973). Otherwise they will need a “strong state” (Hobbes, Leviathan), which prevents them from indulging in violence and deceit and takes their decisions for them. Democracy cannot be maintained by force but only by good, democratic education.

In order to develop the necessary competence children need help from the school. The school must provide suitable learning opportunities, not only in ethics and politics lessons, but in all subjects. The use of the Konstanz Method of Dilemma Discussion and Discussion Theater require good training if they are to be applied responsibly and effectively. Without sufficient training and certification the KMDD and DT are ineffective and can even have negative effects.

In contrast to other methods of education for democracy their application requires no changes in the curriculum, timetable or school organization. Every teacher can employ it on his own re­spon­­sibility. It takes up little time and hence does not involve any curtailment in the rest of the curriculum. On the contrary, it has a positive effect on the students’ motivation to learn and on the learning climate in the classroom. A biology teacher reports that after a KMDD session her stu­dents worked through the learning material much more quickly than before. They also asked more questions and discussed more extensively what they had learned. “They now know better why they are learning”.

 

References

Adler, Mortimer: A revolution in education. American Educator: The Professional Journal of the American Federation of Teachers, 6(4) 1982, 20-24.

Adorno, Theodor W., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D. J. & Sanford, N.: The authoritarian personality. New York, 1950.

Althof, Wolfgang: Just community sources and transformations: A conceptual archaeology of Kohlberg’s approach to moral and democratic education. In: B. Zizek, D. Garz & E. Nowak, ed., Kohlberg revisited, 51-90. Sense, 2015.

Arendt, Hannah: Über das Böse. Eine Vorlesung zu Fragen der Ethik. Munich, 2007.

Barber, Benjamin: An aristocracy of everyone. The politics of education and the future of America. New York, 1992.

Bargel, Tino, Markiewicz, Władysław & Peisert, Hansgert: University graduates: Study expe­rience and social role. Empirical findings of a comparative study in five European countries. In: M. Niessen & J. Pe­schar, ed., Comparative research on education, 55-78. Oxford. 1982.

Berliner, David C. & Glass, Gene V. : Myths and lies that threaten America’s public schools. New York, 2014.

Blatt, Moshe & Kohlberg, Lawrence: The effect of classroom moral discussion upon children’s level of moral judgment. Journal of Moral, Education, 4, 1975, 129-161.

Comunian, Anna L. & Gielen, Uwe P.: Promotion of moral judgement maturity through stimu­lation of social role-taking and social reflection: an Italian intervention study. Journal of Moral Education, 35 (1), 2006, 51-69.

Darling-Hammond, Linda & Ancess, J.: Democracy and access to education. In: R. Soder, ed., Democracy, education, and the schools, 151-181. San Francisco, 1996.

Hemmerling, Kay: Morality behind bars – An intervention study on fostering moral compe­tence of prisoners as a new approach to social rehabilitation. Frankfurt, 2015.

Jefferson, Thomas: Letters (arranged by W. Whitman). Eau Claire, WI, 1940.

Keasey, Charles B.: The influence of opinion-agreement and qualitative supportive reasoning in the evaluation of moral judgments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 30, 1974, 477-482.

Kohlberg, Lawrence: Development of moral character and moral ideology. M. L. Hoffman & L. W. Hoff­man, eds., Review of Child Development Research, Vol. I, 381-431. New York, 1964.

Kohlberg, Lawrence: Essays on moral development, Vol. II, The psychology of moral deve­lop­ment. San Francisco, 1984.

Koretz, Daniel: The testing charade. Pretending to make schools better. Chicago, 2017.

Lind, Georg: Measuring moral judgment: A review of ‘The measurement of moral judgment’ by Anne Colby and Lawrence Kohlberg. Human Development, 32, 1989, 388-397.

Lind, Georg: Ist Moral lehrbar? Ergebnisse der modernen moralpsychologischen Forschung. [Can morality be taught? Findings from modern moral psychological research.] Berlin, 2002.

Lind, Georg: Jenseits von PISA — Für eine neue Evaluationskultur. In: Institut für Schul­ent­wick­lung, ed., Standards, Evaluation und neue Methoden, 1-7. Baltmannsweiler, 2004.

Lind, Georg: Perspektive ‘Moralisches und demokratisches Lernen. In: A. Fritz, R. Klupsch-Sahl­mann & G. Ricken, eds., Handbuch Kindheit und Schule. Neue Kindheit, neues Ler­nen, neuer Unter­richt, 296-309. Weinheim, 2006.

Lind, Georg: Amerika als Vorbild? Erwünschte und unerwünschte Folgen aus Evaluationen. In: T. Bohl & H. Kiper., eds., Lernen aus Evaluationsergebnissen – Verbesserungen planen und im­ple­men­tieren, 63-81. Bad Heilbrunn, 2009.

Lind, Georg: How to teach morality. Promoting deliberation and discussion, reducing violence and deceit. Berlin, 2016.

Lind, Georg: Moralerziehung auf den Punkt gebracht. Bad Schwalbach, 2017a.

Lind, Georg: Soll die Schule Werte vermitteln oder Moralkompetenz fördern? Pädagogik, 12/17, 2017b, 34-37.

McFaul, Michael: Democracy promotion as a world value. The Washington Quarterly, 28 (1), 2004, 147-163.

Narvaez, Darcia: Moral text comprehension: implications for education and research. Journal of Moral Education, 30(1), 2001, 43-54.

Nowak, Ewa & Lind, Georg: Mis-educative martial law – The fate of free discourse and the moral judgment competence of Polish university students from 1977 to 1983. In: M. Zirk-Sa­dows­ki, B. Wojciechowski, & M. Golecki, eds., Between complexity and chaos, 129-152. Torun, Polen, 2009.

Nowak, Ewa, Schrader, Dawn & Zizek, Boris, ed.: Educating competencies for democracy. Frank­­­furt, 2013.

Portele, Gerhard: “Du sollst das wollen!” Zum Paradox der Sozialisation. In: G. Portele, ed., Soziali­sation und Moral, 147-168. Weinheim, 1978.

Power, F. Clark, Higgins, Ann & Kohlberg, Lawrence: Lawrence Kohlberg’s approach to moral edu­cation. New York, 1989.

Ravitch, Diane: The death and life of the great American school system: How testing and choice are undermining education. New York, 2010.

Schillinger, Marcia: Learning environments and moral development: How university education fosters moral judgment competence in Brazil and two German-speaking countries. Aachen, 2006.

Sen, Amartya: Democracy as a universal value. Journal of Democracy, 10 (3), 1999, 3-17.

Speicher, Betsy: Family patterns of moral judgment during adolescence and early adulthood. Developmental Psychology, 30, 1994, 624-632.

Sjoberg, S.: PISA and ‘Real Life Challenge’: Mission impossible? In: S. T. Hopfmann et al., ed., PISA zufolge PISA, 203-224. Berlin, 2007.

Tocqueville, Alexis de:. Über die Demokratie in Amerika. Munich, 1976 (Original 1835).

Walker, Lawrence J.: Sources of cognitive conflict for stage transition in moral development. Developmental Psychology, 19, 1983, 103-110.

Wasel, Wolfgang: Simulation moralischer Urteilsfähigkeit. Moralentwicklung: eine kognitiv-struk­turelle Veränderung oder ein affektives Phänomen? Universität Konstanz, 1994.

Westheimer, Joel: Teaching for democratic action. Educação & Realidade, 40 (2), 2015, 465-483.

[1] Copyright 2018 by Georg.Lind@uni-konstanz.de. Web: https://www.uni-konstanz.de/ag-moral/

Advertisements

Demokratie-Erziehung!

Georg Lind

Eine moralische Aufgabe der Schule in der Demokratie

Unter den Idealen, die Erziehung anleiten, ist das moralische Ideal eines demokratischen Zusam­menlebens das zentralste, aber auch das am schwersten zu erreichende. Lehrer, Eltern und Schüler fragen sich, wie der Gegensatz zwischen dem demokratischen Freiheitsversprechen und dem auto­kratischen Selbstverständnis traditioneller Erziehung aufgelöst werden kann. Wie kann man Her­anwachsende zu mündigen Demokraten erziehen, wenn die Methoden der Erziehung sie in Un­mündigkeit halten? Wie kann man sie ermutigen, selbst zu denken und bestehende Normen und Erwartungen zu hinterfragen, ohne dass sie dadurch zu anarchistischen Rebellen oder liber­tären Individualisten werden, die in demokratischen Grundwerten wie Gerechtigkeit und Soli­da­rität eine Behinderung ihrer Selbstentfaltung oder ihres wirtschaftlichen Erfolgs sehen?

Für Sokrates war die Hauptaufgabe der Erziehung, das Bestehende zu hinterfragen, auch die Erziehung selbst: Ist Tugend lehrbar? Was ist Tugend über­haupt? Alle Menschen wollen das Gute; ihnen fehlt es aber meist am Können. Sollte Erzie­hung daher nicht eher das Können fördern, statt sich auf Werte und Wollen zu konzentrieren?

Sokrates war der Auffassung, dass Erziehung keine Antworten geben, sondern nur Fragen stel­­len kann. Die damalige Regierung von Athen hielt diese Art der Erziehung für An­stif­tung zu Rebellion und Anarchie und für eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft, und verurteilte Sokra­­tes daher zu Tode. Dabei stellte er keineswegs alles in Frage. Als Freunde ihm anboten, ihm zur Flucht zu ver­helfen, weigerte sich Sokrates zu fliehen. Seine Begründung vermittelt eine mäch­­tige mora­lische Botschaft: mit seiner Flucht, so Sokrates, würde er Recht und Ordnung in Frage stellen, für die er sich immer engagiert habe.

Möglicherweise erkannte er selbst die Gefahr seiner Fragen, wenn sie auf Bürger treffen, die noch keine Fähigkeit zum eigenen Denken entwickelt haben. Bei ihnen können kritische Fragen, wie Hannah Arendt (2007) zu Sokrates anmerkte, zur Ablehnung der bestehenden Normen führen, ohne dass sie dafür eigene, innere Normen, also echte Moral an deren Stelle setzen können.

Dies aber stellt hohe Anforderungen an die moralisch-demokratische Kompetenz, das heißt die Fähigkeit jedes Einzelnen, Probleme und Konflikte, die bei einer Orientierung des eigenen Verhaltens an Moralprinzipien unvermeidlich auftreten, allein durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere, denen man die Last der Ver­ant­wortung (und damit auch Macht) überträgt.

Wie der indisch-amerikanische Philosoph Amartya Sen (1999) feststellt, sind es so einfach er­scheinende Dinge, wie das Reden und Zuhören, die ein demokratisches, selbstregiertes Zusam­men­leben erst ermöglichen. In einer Demokratie, so Sen, muss jeder Bürger fähig sein, mit Ande­ren zu reden und ihnen zuzuhören, wenn es um wichtige Dinge geht. Die Bürger müssen, so auch Darling-Hammond und Ancess (1996), “fähig sein, rivalisierende Vorstellungen vernünftig zu dis­kutieren und sich zwischen ihnen zu entscheiden, individuelle und soziale Güter abzuwägen, wenn sie das demokratische Ideal angesichts der komplexen Herausforderungen aufrechterhalten wollen, mit denen alle Gesellschaften konfrontiert sind.” (S. 154, meine Übers.) Diese Fähigkeit fehlt vielen Menschen, wie schon Sokrates feststellte und wie unsere Studien zeigen, weil sie offen­­­bar zu wenige Gelegenheiten haben, sie zu entwickeln. (Lind 2002; 2015)

Für diese Gelegenheiten zur Entwicklung von Demokratiekompetenz muss heute vor allem die Schule sorgen, durch Allgemeinbildung und durch Demokratieerziehung.

 

Der demokratische Zweck der Allgemeinbildung

Wie wichtig die Allgemeinbildung aller Bürger für die Schaffung und den Erhalt der Demokratie ist, hat vor allem Thomas Jefferson aufgezeigt, dem Mitautor der amerikanischen Unabhängig­keitserklärung: “Dies ist die sicherste und legitimste Kraft der Regierung: Bilde und informiere alle Menschen. Befähige sie zu erkennen, dass es in ihrem Interesse ist, Frieden und Ordnung zu bewahren, und sie werden sie bewahren. Und es braucht nicht sehr viel Bildung, um sie zu über­zeugen. Sie sind die einzige sichere Grundlage für die Sicherung unserer Freiheit” (Jefferson 1940, meine Übers.).

Auch der französische Politologe Alexis de Tocqueville, der die damals noch junge “Demo­kratie in Amerika” ausgiebig bereiste und seine Eindrücke 1835 in einem Buch analysierte, hat – neben Gewaltenteilung und zivilem Engagement – die Bildung aller Bürger für den dritten Pfeiler der Demokratie angesehen. Er empfahl der Regierung, alles Geld, das sie erübrigen konn­ten, für Bildung auszugeben, weil nur so verhindert werden kann, dass die Demokratie in eine Diktatur um­schlägt. “Allgemeines Wahlrecht ohne Bildung produziert Mobokratie, nicht Demo­kra­tie” (Adler 1982, S. 3). Für Demokratieforscher wie Benjamin Barber (1992) sind Bildung und Demo­kratie daher “untrennbar verbunden” (S. 9).

Die Einsicht von Jefferson, Tocqueville, Adler und Barber – dass Bildung in erster Linie dazu dient, die Menschen zur Selbstregierung zu befähigen und damit Rassismus, Nationalismus, Bür­ger­krieg und Diktatur zu verhindern – prägte die Bildungspolitik der jungen Bundesrepublik nach Zusammenbruch der Nazi-Diktatur. Weil die Bildung im Interesse des demokratischen Ge­mein­wesens liegt, sollte sie allen Bürger offenstehen und kostenlos sein. Das öffentliche Bil­dungs­we­sen hat sich als wichtige, vielleicht sogar als die wichtigste Säule unserer Demokratie heraus­ge­stellt.

 

Die Umwertung der Bildung

Heute scheint diese Einsicht jedoch immer mehr verloren zu gehen. In dem Maß, wie der Schre­cken der Nazi-Diktatur verblasst, wird aus der demokratischen Pflicht zur Bildung ein indi­vidu­el­les Recht auf Karrierevorbereitung. Der demokratische Bildungsauftrag der Schule wird heute oft gar nicht mehr erwähnt, wenn es um die Erhaltung der Demokratie geht. Bildung wird heute oft nur noch mittelbar als wichtig für das Schicksal der Demokratie angesehen, indem sie hilft die Wirtschaftsleistung zu erhöhen. Die Qualität der Bildung wird daher nicht mehr an ihrem Beitrag zum demokratischen Zusammenleben gemessen, sondern an den (vermuteten) Anfor­de­rungen der Wirtschaft.

Infolge dieser Umwertung der Bildung wird die Aufgabe der Schule heute oft nur noch darin gesehen, die Lese- und Rechenfähigkeit und das Sachwissen unserer Kinder zu fördern. Wohin das führt, lässt sich an den USA ablesen. Dort hat man bereits vor mehr als fünfzig Jahren an­ge­fan­gen, den Wert des Unterrichts an diesen einfach testbaren Kenntnissen der Schüler zu mes­sen, statt an der Entwicklung ihrer Denk- und Diskussionsfähigkeit. Inzwischen sind Test­werte die Grundlage für die Bewertung von Schülern, Lehrern und Schulen, so dass der Unterricht sich immer mehr an den Vorgaben der Testindustrie ausrichtet statt an den Bedürfnissen der Demo­kratie. Das Lernen in der Schule wird immer mehr auf die Bereiche beschränkt, die mit einfachen Tests geprüft und sanktioniert werden (“teaching to the test”).

Der intensive Einsatz von Straf-bewehrten („high stakes“) Tests, die mit harten Sanktionen für die Schüler und ihre Schulen verbunden sind (Ravitch 2010), und die Privatisierung von Schulen bedrohen die Demokratie als Lebensform (Dewey), ohne dass die Wirtschaft davon erkennbar profi­tiert (Berliner & Glass 2014). Noch nicht einmal zu besseren Testleistungen hat das 50jährige Regiment dieser Straf-Tests geführt (Lind 2009).

Die Angst einflößenden Tests, die unter hohem Zeitdruck bearbeitet werden müssen, behin­dern massiv das Denken und die Diskussion, die eine Voraussetzung für die Entwicklung von moralisch-demokratischer Kompetenz sind. Diese Tests legen apodiktisch fest, was richtig und was falsch ist. Sie erlauben keine Rückfragen und keine Kritik, und sie lassen keine Zeit zum Nach­­denken. Am Beispiel einer Mathe-Aufgabe aus den PISA-Tests zeigt Sjoberg (2007), wie “unrealistisch und falsch” viele der Test-Aufgaben sind. “Schüler, die einfach ohne Denken Zah­len in die vorgegebene Formel einsetzen, bekommen den Punkt. Kritischere Schüler, die an­fangen nachzudenken, werden jedoch verwirrt und bekommen Probleme!” (S. 217) Diese Tests erlauben auch keine Diskussion zwischen Schülern und Lehrern, wie das in gutem Unterricht möglich ist.

Je mehr diese Tests das Leben der Kinder bestimmen, umso mehr schwinden für sie die Gele­genheiten, in denen sie ihre Moralkompetenz erproben können, und um so mehr bleibt ihre Moral­ent­wick­lung zurück. Wer nicht lernen darf, wie man Probleme durch Denken und Diskus­sion löst, dem bleiben nur Gewalt und Betrug. Wer nicht erfahren konnte, dass man Konflikte durch Dialog lösen kann, betrachtet andere Menschen mit Argwohn und versucht sich vor ihnen durch den Er­werb materiellen Besitzes und durch Unterwerfung unter Führer zu schützen, die ein hartes Vor­ge­hen gegen Menschen mit abweichender Meinung und die Abschaffung der Demo­kratie ver­sprechen (Adorno et al. 1950).

Wenn Moralkompetenz die Fähigkeit ist, gemäß innerer moralischer Prinzipien zu urteilen und zu handeln (Kohlberg 1964), dann ist Demokratiekompetenz ihre Erweiterung auf die dis­kursive Auseinandersetzung mit Anderen. Sie ist die Fähigkeit, Probleme und Konflikte nicht nur durch Denken, sondern auch durch Diskussion mit Anderen zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere.

Geringe Demokratiekompetenz steht, wie psycho­logische Studien (zum Teil auch experi­men­tell) be­legen, in der Tat in einem kausalen Zusam­menhang mit Autoritätsgehorsam, Gewalt, Betrug, Vertragsbruch, Vertuschung von Straftaten, Unterlassung von Hilfe, Entscheidungs­schwäche, Drogenmissbrauch, ja sogar mit geringer Lernleistung und schlechten Schulnoten in den akade­mischen Fächern, sowie mit einem geringem Engagement für demokratische Grund­werte. (Für Quellenhinweise siehe Hemmerling 2014; Lind 2015)

 

Der Auftrag der Demokratie-Erziehung

Was kann Demokratie-Erziehung diesen gesellschaftlichen Entwicklungen entgegensetzen? Kann sie der Schlüssel für den Erhalt und die Stärkung der Demokratie werden?

Demokratiekompetenz ist bei Geburt in uns angelegt, aber sie entwickelt sich erst voll durch Ge­brauch, das heißt, ihre Entwicklung ist abhängig davon, dass wir Gelegenheiten finden, die eine Herausforderung für unsere Fähigkeiten darstellen, die sie aber nicht überfordern. Viele Kinder finden zu wenige solche Lerngelegenheiten in der Umwelt, in der sie aufwachsen (Lind 2006). Eltern geben ihren Kindern solche Lerngelegenheiten, soweit sie die Zeit dazu finden und das tun können. Es tun eher die Eltern, die ihrerseits genügend Bildung ge­nießen durften (Speicher 1994). Die Entwicklung von Moralkompetenz ist daher bei den meisten Kindern auf die Hilfestellung durch die Schule angewiesen.

Offenbar leisten das viele Schulen und Lehrpersonen bei uns, obwohl dieses “Fach” bis heute weder in der Lehrerausbildung noch im Stundenplan vorkommt. Umfang und Qualität von Schul­bildung ist der mit Abstand stärkste Faktor für die Entwicklung der Moralkompetenz. Zusammen­hänge mit sozialer Schicht, kulturellem Hintergrund und Geschlecht, wie sie manchmal berichtet werden, sind dagegen deutlich geringer und verschwinden oft, wenn man den Anteil, den Bildung an diesem Zusammenhang hat, heraus rechnet (Lind 2002).

Angesichts der großen Herausforderungen unserer heutigen Zeit (wie soziale Ungleichheit, tech­­nischer Wandel, Immigration, Inklusion von Behinderten, Umweltverschmutzung, Arten­ster­ben, bewaffnete Konflikte, Terrorismus, Fremdenfeindlichkeit, Drogensucht) reichen die Gele­gen­­­heiten zur moralisch-demokratischen Entwicklung, die Schulen heute bieten, jedoch nicht aus und sie sind nicht nachhaltig. Sie reichen nicht aus, weil sie meist vom individuellen Einsatz der Lehrer und von den Freiräumen abhängen, die Leistungsdruck und Schulaufsicht ihnen lassen. Viel zu viele Schüler haben am Ende der Schulzeit noch nicht einmal das Minimum an Moral­kom­­petenz erreicht, das notwendig ist, um Probleme und Konflikte im Alltag durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen.

Die Moralerziehung an unseren Schulen ist auch nicht nachhaltig, weil viele Schüler nicht den Grad an Moralkompetenz erreichen, der notwendig ist, um später alleine, ohne Schule, Lern­ge­le­gen­heiten aufzusuchen und sich dadurch weiterzuentwickeln. Menschen mit geringer Moral­kom­petenz empfinden viele Entscheidungssituationen nicht als Lerngelegenheiten, sondern als be­droh­­­­­lich, weil diese sie überfordern. Die Vermeidung solcher Gelegenheiten aber lässt ihre Moral­kompetenz weiter verkümmern. Dieses Regressionsphänomen findet sich bei fast allen Kindern, die weniger als zwölf Jahre Schulbildung bekommen haben (Lind 2002). Bei Erwachsenen treten Re­gressionen der Moralkompetenz dann auf, wenn sie in ihrem Lebensraum zu wenig Gelegen­heit zu deren Gebrauch bekommen, wie das oft bei Straf­ge­fangenen (Hemmerling 2014), aber auch bei Medizinstudierenden (Schillinger 2006) der Fall ist.

Wie die Moralforschung zeigt, muss die Schule nicht unbedingt mehr tun, um bei allen Schü­lern die Moralkompetenz ausreichend und nachhaltig zu fördern. Sie muss es aber gezielter tun, das heißt, sie muss es mit besseren Methoden und mit besser ausgebildeten Lehrern als bisher tun.

 

Welche Methode?

Von den heute vorherrschenden Methoden genügt kaum eine den Anforderungen an eine wirk­same Demokratie-Erziehung:

Institutionenkunde: Bislang meinten wir, für den Erhalt der Demokratie reiche es, den Her­an­wachsenden demokratisches Wissen zu vermitteln, das heißt, sie mit dem Grundgesetz und den staatlichen Institutionen vertraut zu machen. Die Vermittlung dieses Wissens könnte den Heran­wachsenden Gelegenheit bieten, zwischen dem individuellen Guten und dem sozial Guten abzu­wägen und rivalisierende Vorstellungen über die Bedeutung von demokratischen Grund­prinzipien wie Gerechtigkeit, Freiheit und Solidarität zu diskutieren. Oft wird diese Gelegenheit im Unter­richt aber nicht wahrgenommen, weil Prüfungs- und Notendruck dafür keine Zeit lassen, oder weil die Lehrperson es sich nicht zutraut, mit Denken und Diskussion im Unterricht umzugehen (Lind 2015).

Wertevermittlung/Ethik-Unterricht: Die Demokratie lebt davon, dass die Bürger sie wollen und Idealen wie Gerechtigkeit, Freiheit und Kooperation einen hohen Wert zumessen. Tatsächlich nimmt dieses Ideal für die meisten Menschen überall in der Welt einen sehr hohen Rang ein (Sen 1996; McFaul 2004), sogar auch dann, wenn sie von real existierenden Demokratien enttäuscht sind und sie selbst ihre Ideale oft verfehlen. Die Vermittlung von Werten durch die Schule ist da­her nicht nur über­flüssig. Sie ist auch ein “performativer Selbstwiderspruch” (Apel) zu dem Frei­­heits­ideal der De­mo­­kratie (Lind 2017b). Die theoretische Vermittlung von moralischen Wer­ten in Form von Vor­trägen oder Lesetexten zeigt überdies keine empirisch belegbare Wirkung auf die Entwicklung der Moral­kompetenz (Narvaez 2001; Lind 2002).

Demokratie leben: Diese Methode ‘Demokratie leben’ ist nur bedingt geeignet, um Mo­ral­kom­petenz zu fördern. Zum einen erreichen die Lerngelegenheiten, die sie bietet, oft nur einen Bruch­teil der Jugendlichen, zumeist nur jene, die bereits eine relativ hohe Moralkompetenz haben und die sich durch diese Methode nicht überfordert fühlen (Comunian & Gielen 2006). Zum an­de­ren hängt die Wirksamkeit von ‘Demokratie leben’ sehr von der Qualität der erfahrenen “Demo­kratie” und der begleitenden pädagogischen Angeboten ab (Westheimer 2015). Selbst die Just commu­nity-Schulen, in denen demokratische Verfahren vorbildlich praktiziert werden, kön­nen die Moral­­­kompetenz von Schülern nicht wirksam fördern. In den JC-Projekten in den USA fand sich unterm Strich kein Entwicklungsgewinn für die Teilnehmer (Power et al. 1998; Lind 2002). In dem Projekt “Demokratie und Erziehung in der Schule” in Deutschland ergab sich ein deutli­cher Lernzuwachs (Lind & Althof 1992), der aber nicht eindeutig der Methode “Demokratie leben” zu­gerechnet werden kann, da die Schüler gleichzeitig an vielen Dilemmadiskussionen teil­nehmen konnten, deren Lehreffektivität eindeutig belegt ist (Lind 2002; 2015). Dass freie Diskus­sionen und echte Teilhabe an einer demokratischen Willensbildung einen Fördereffekt haben kön­nen, zeigt ein Zufallsbefund der Konstanzer Längsschnittstudie bei Universitäts­stu­die­renden in fünf europäischen Ländern von 1977 bis 1985 (Bargel et al. 1982). Während in vier Ländern nur eine schwache Zunahme der Moralkompetenz während des Studiums zu verzeichnen war, nahm sie bei den Studierenden in Polen Ende der 1970er Jahre stark zu, als sich vielen von ihnen die Ge­legen­heit bot, sich an der demokratischen Bewegung in ihrem Land zu beteiligen (Nowak & Lind 2009).

Dilemma-Diskussion: Diese von Moshe Blatt und Lawrence Kohlberg (1975) entwickelte Methode der Demokratie-Erziehung hat sich zwar als sehr effektiv erwiesen, um die moralische Urteilfähigkeit von Schülern zu stimulieren (Lind 2002), wurde aber von Kohlberg und seinen Schülern später für tot erklärt, weil Lehrer sie nicht annahmen (Althof 2015). Für Kohlberg (1964) besteht moralische Urteils­fähigkeit in dem “Vermögen, Entscheidungen und Urteile zu treffen, die moralisch sind, das heißt, auf inneren Prinzipien beruhen und in Übereinstimmung mit diesen Urteilen zu handeln.” (S. 303; meine Übers.) Um diese zu fördern, sieht die Methode vor, dass die Lehrperson die Schü­ler mit mehreren Dilemma-Geschichten konfrontiert und sie dazu jeweils ihre Meinung ab­geben und diese begründen müssen. Um die Lehrwirkung zu maximieren, soll die Lehrperson den Schü­lern Argumente anbieten, die genau eine Stufe über deren Ent­wick­lungsstufe liegen (die so ge­nannte “plus-1-Konvention”). Dazu muss die Lehrperson (mit Hilfe von Kohlbergs Inter­view­me­thode) vor dem Unterricht die “Stufe der moralischen Urteilsfähig­keit” ihrer Schüler er­mitteln. Die Wirk­samkeit der Blatt-Kohlberg-Methode wurde so intensiv empirisch überprüft, wie bis da­hin keine andere Methode der Moralerziehung, allein zwischen 1970 und 1984 in über 140 Inter­ventions­studien. Die durchschnittliche Effektstärke der Methode war erstaunlich hoch (sie betrug r = 0.40 bzw. d = 0.88, ein Wert, der bis dahin von kaum einer pädagogischen Methode je er­reicht wurde. Lind 2002).

Die Gründe, warum die Lehrer die Blatt-Kohlberg-Methode trotz ihrer hohen Wirksamkeit nicht übernehmen wollen, können vielfach sein. Sie ist sehr aufwändig: sie setzt eine intensive Schulung der Lehrpersonen voraus und sie verlangt die Durchführung von langen Interviews mit den Schülern, die nur von Experten ausgewertet werden können. Zudem sind diese Interviews sub­jektiv und für die Lehrer nicht transparent (Lind 1989). Schwer wiegt auch, dass die Vorgabe von Argumenten (plus-1-Konvention) im Gegensatz zu Kohlbergs eigener Entwicklungstheorie steht, die auf entdeckendes Lernen, statt auf Nachahmung setzt. Tatsächlich zeigt das Experiment von Lawrence Walker (1983), dass die Argumente der Lehrer vermutlich nicht dadurch wirken, dass die Schüler sie nachahmen, sondern dadurch, dass sie diese zum Denken anregen. Dieselbe Wirkung zeigen nämlich auch Gegenargumente, die von Gleichaltrigen vorgebracht werden. Die Methode könnte also noch wirksamer sein, wenn der Lehrer sich mehr zurücknehmen und den Schülern mehr Raum für die Diskussion untereinander geben würde. (Lind 2015)

 

Moralisch-demokratische Kompetenz kann und muss durch die Schule gefördert werden

Diese Erfahrungen mit der Blatt-Kohlberg-Methode und die Befunde der Moral- und Demo­kra­tiepsychologie hatten Ende der 1990er Jahre wichtige neue Erkenntnisse über die Natur, Mess­barkeit, Relevanz, Ent­wick­lung und Lehrbarkeit der Moral erbracht, die den Weg für eine neue Ausrichtung der Demokratie-Erziehung wiesen (Lind 2002; 2015; 2017a; 2017b). Wir wissen jetzt, dass für demokratisch kompetentes Verhalten zwei verschiedene Aspekte moralischer Gefühle wichtig sind: Zum einen der zentrale Aspekt der Orientierung. Die Orientierung an demokratische Moralprinzipien wie Gerech­tigkeit, Freiheit und Kooperation ist für moralisches Verhalten unabdingbar. Sie muss uns jedoch nicht beschäftigen: sie ist uns aber ange­boren und tief in unseren Gefühlen verankert – so dass sie uns nicht erst durch Erzie­hung ver­mit­telt werden muss. Zum anderen ist es der kognitive Aspekt der Fähigkeit, gemäß solcher Orientierungen zu handeln. Diese gefühlten Moralprinzipien sind mäch­tig, aber sie reichen nicht aus, um richtige Entscheidungen zu treffen. Sie sind meist sehr unbestimmt und leicht in die Irre zu führen und sie bringen uns oft in Dilemma-Situationen, in denen sich jede denk­bare Entscheidung als moralisch falsch herausstellt.

Die Fähigkeit, Probleme und Kon­flikte auf der Grund­lage von (gefühlten) moralischen Prin­zipien zu lösen, und zwar durch eigenes Denken und durch Diskussion mit Anderen, also ohne Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere, nennen wir moralisch-demokratische Kom­pe­tenz oder kurz Moralkompetenz (Lind 2016) Wie hoch oder niedrig unsere Moral­kompe­tenz ist, ist uns kaum bewusst. Ihre Höhe kann also nicht einfach abgefragt wer­den. Sie zeigt sich aber im Verhalten. Zum Beispiel zeigt sie sich sehr klar in Diskus­si­onen, wenn Teil­nehmer die Argumente von Unterstützern und Gegnern be­urteilen. Die meisten Menschen beurteilen Argu­mente nur nach deren Übereinstimmung (oder Nichtüber­einstimmung) mit der eigenen Meinung. Es fällt ihnen schwer, sie nach ihrer mora­lischen Qualität zu beurteilen, was aber unverzichtbar für einen demo­kratischen Diskurs ist (Habermas 1990). Der Grad, mit der Menschen die Argu­mente Anderer unabhängig von ihrer Meinungskonformität auch nach ihrer moralischen Qualität beurteilen kön­nen, hat sich als ein guter Indikator für Moralkompetenz erwiesen (Keasey 1974; Lind 2015). Welchen Einfluss diese Fähigkeit auf unser Verhalten hat, konnte bis vor kurzem wissenschaftlich nicht erforscht werden, weil dazu geeignete Instrumente fehlten. Die objektiven Messinstru­men­te, die uns vorlagen, waren ungeeignet (Lind 2015). Sie erlaubten nur fest­zu­stellen, wie gut das indi­vidu­elle Ver­halten bestimmte äußere, soziale Normen erfüllt. Sie erlaubten aber nicht festzu­stel­len, wie gut es den inneren Moral­prinzi­pien des Einzelnen ent­spricht. So genannte qualitative Methoden wie Kohl­bergs klinische Interview-Methode, konnte man inneren Beweg­gründen nach­gehen; aber sie waren nicht objektiv genug, um subjektive Verzerrungen der Daten ausschließen zu können (Lind 1989).

Erst mit Hilfe des Moralische Kompetenz-Tests (MKT) ist es möglich geworden, moralische Orientierung und Kompetenz sowohl gültig als auch objektiv zu messen (Lind 2015, Kapitel 4). Der MKT macht beide Aspekte des Antwortverhalten durch ein spezielles, multivariat angelegtes Test-Design sichtbar und messbar. Der MKT gibt zwei Dilemma-Geschichten vor und lässt die Be­frag­ten eine Reihe von Argumente für und gegen die Entscheidungen beurteilen. Die Argumen­te sind so gewählt, dass sie jeweils eine bestimmte moralische Orientierung repräsentieren. Das Muster der Antworten auf den MKT lässt erkennen, ob und inwieweit die Befragten fähig sind, Argu­mente nach ihrer moralischen Qualität zu beurteilen, statt nach ihrer Meinungskonfor­mität.

Die Forschung mit Kohlbergs Interview-Methode und mit dem MKT hat übereinstimmend ergeben, a) dass diese Fähigkeit sehr ungleich verteilt und insgesamt sehr niedrig ist, b) dass sie – wie das bei Fähigkeiten der Fall sein muss – nicht nach oben simuliert werden kann und c) dass sie kausal mit verschiedenen Demokratie-relevanten Verhaltensweisen und Fähigkeiten verknüpft ist (vgl. u. a. Kohlberg 1995; Lind 2015): Moralkompetenz bestimmt zum Beispiel in hohem Maße, ob Men­schen einen Ver­trag einhalten, ob sie in Prüfungssituationen ehrlich sind, ob sie ihre Lebens­probleme ohne Rück­griff auf Drogen zu lösen versuchen, ob sie Verbrechen anzeigen, auch wenn ihnen da­durch Nachteile drohen, ob sie Menschen in Not helfen, ob sie Anordnungen von Autoritäten kri­tisch prüfen, bevor sie ihre Anordnungen auszuführen, ob sie in Dilemma­situationen schnell eine Lösung finden, ob sie Gewalt zur Durchsetzung ihrer politischen Ziele ein­setzen, und ob sie sich aktiv für die Einhaltung demokratische Grundrechte einsetzen. Neue Stu­dien zeigen zu­dem, dass Menschen mit hoher Moralkompetenz sich Fakten besser merken kön­nen, bessere Noten in Mathe und Deutsch und eine bessere Durchschnittsnote im Abitur haben. Besonders wichtig für das Zusammenleben in einer Demokratie ist auch der Befund von Wasel (1994), dass Menschen die Moralkompetenz anderer Menschen umso genauer einschätzen können, je höher ihre eigene Moralkompetenz ist. In gewissem Sinne stimmt es also, dass ein Volk die Re­gie­rung hat, die es “verdient”. Aber auch das Umgekehrte scheint zuzutreffen: Wenn eine demo­kratische Regie­rung die Bildung ihrer Bürger vernachlässigt, bekommt sie ein Volk, das sich nach mehr Autorität und weniger Demokratie sehnt.

Moralkompetenz bedarf also, wie unsere Muskeln, der Entwicklung durch Gebrauch. So wie unsere Muskeln sich nur entwickeln, wenn sie benutzt werden, entwickelt sich offen­bar auch diese Kompetenz nur in dem Maße, wie sie benutzt wird. Dabei spielen Zahl und Art der Gelegen­hei­ten, die wir in unserer Umwelt vorfinden, eine entscheidende Rolle. Es sollten nicht zu wenige, aber auch nicht zu viele, nicht nur einfache, aber auch keine zu starken Probleme und Konflikte sein, die unsere Moralkompetenz auf die Probe stellen. Wo der optimale Bereich liegt, schiebt sich, ähnlich wie auf anderen Gebieten, mit zunehmender Entwicklung der Moral­kompetenz in Richtung höherer Herausforderungen hinaus. Ab einem bestimmten Entwicklungs­stand ist der Einzelne selbst in der Lage, geeignete Lerngelegenheiten aufzusuchen und seine Moral­kompetenz selbst zu trainieren. Um diesen Entwicklungsstand zu erreichen, sind die meisten Menschen, wie schon erwähnt, auf eine gute und ausreichend lange Schulbildung angewiesen.

 

Die Konstanzer Methode der Dilemma-Diskussion

Auf der Grundlage dieser Erkenntnisse habe ich die Konstanzer Methode der Dilemma-Diskus­sion (KMDD) entwickelt. Sie hat einige Elemente der Blatt-Kohlberg-Methode aufgenommen, unterscheidet sich aber stark von ihr (Lind 2015; 2017a; Reinicke 2017). Sie wird seit über zwan­zig Jahren in unterschiedlichen Bildungsinstitutionen angewandt: In Schulen ab der dritten Klas­sen­­stufe, in Berufsschulen, in Hochschulen, in Gefängnissen und in Militärakademien. Sie wird neben Deutschland auch in mehreren anderen Ländern eingesetzt, unter anderem auch in China. Sie hat sich als sehr effektiv erwiesen. Bereits eine einzige KMDD-Sitzung bewirkt einen größe­ren Zuwachs an Moralkompetenz als ein ganzes Schuljahr. Voraussetzung für den effektiven und verantwortungsvollen Einsatz der KMDD ist jedoch eine gründliche Ausbildung der Lehrer, die sie anwenden. Ohne sie zeigt sich keine oder eine negative Wirkung (Lind 2015).

Wir setzen die KMDD jetzt auch im öffentlichen Raum als „Diskussions-Theater“ (DT) ein. Das Stück, das wir aufführen, heißt „Reden & Zuhören“. Erste Aufführungen in der Dresdner Frauen­kirche und in Poznan, Polen, waren gut besucht und erfolgreich verlaufen. Sie zeigen, dass es ein Bedürfnis nach ernsthaften, freien Diskussionen mit Anderen über heikle Themen gibt, die frei von Anwür­fen und Aggression sind.

Zwar sind KMDD und DT ein Stück Theater: im Mittelpunkt immer die Geschichte über die Entscheidung einer fiktiven Person. Aber die Geschichte ist meist so passiert oder hätte genau so passieren können. Vor allem ist die Diskussion zwischen den Unterstützern und den Gegnern der Entscheidung des Protagonisten real: die Teilnehmer am Diskussions-Theater tun, genauso wie bei der KMDD, ihre eigene Meinung kund und versuchen, die Gegner zu überzeugen, dass sie Recht haben. Es handelt sich also bei DT und KMDD nicht um ein Rollenspiel, sondern um eine echte Auseinandersetzung, bei der spürbar Emotionen im Spiel sind. Dennoch ist es in den unzäh­ligen Veranstaltungen, die ich in mehr als zwanzig Jahren geleitet habe, noch nie zu einem Ver­stoß gegen die einzige unveränderbare Regel gekommen, nämlich dass alles gesagt und auch alles beurteilt werden darf, aber nicht Menschen. Bei Regelverstoß gäbe es keine Strafen; es gäbe nur eine Regel-Erinnerung durch den Veranstaltungsleiter. Aber auch die war nie nötig. Es scheint, dass jeder Mensch den Wunsch nach harten, aber fairen Diskussionen hat, und dass es daher ge­nügt, dass der Veranstaltungsleiter, als wahrgenommene Autorität, dies zu Beginn offen sagt und verspricht, über die Einhal­tung dieser Regel zu wachen, sich aber ansonsten inhaltlich nicht in die Diskussion einmischt (Lind 2016).

 

Demokratiefähigkeit kann effektiv und mit wenig Aufwand gefördert werden

Das selbstbestimmte Zusammenleben in einer Demokratie ist nicht einfach. Es kann nur funktio­nieren, wenn alle Bür­ger schon im Kindesalter genügend Gelegenheit bekommen, um ihre Moral­kompetenz zu ent­wickeln. Nur so können sie fähig werden, Probleme und Konflikte nach den Regeln der Moral zu lösen, also durch Denken und Diskussion statt durch Gewalt oder Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere (Habermas 1983). Andernfalls brauchen sie einen “starken Staat” (Hobbes ‘Levia­than’), der sie an Gewalt und Betrug hindert, und der an ihrer Stelle Ent­scheidungen trifft. Eine Demokratie lässt sich nicht zur Macht erhalten, sondern nur durch eine gute, demokratische Bildung.

Die meisten Kinder benötigen, um diese Fähigkeit zu entwickeln, die Unterstützung durch die Schule. Die Schule muss ihnen dazu geeignet Lernge­legen­heiten bereitstellen, nicht nur im Ethik- und Politikunterricht, sondern in allen Fächern. Die Anwendung der Konstanzer Methode der Dilemma-Diskussion und das Diskussions-Theater setzen, wenn sie effektiv und verantwortungs­voll eingesetzt werden sollen, eine gute Ausbildung voraus. Ohne ausreichendes Training und Zer­ti­fi­zierung sind KMDD und DT wirkungslos und können sogar negative Wirkungen haben.

Anders als manche andere Methode der Demokratie-Erziehung macht ihre Anwendung keine Ände­rungen des Lehrplans, der Stundentafel oder der Schulorganisation notwendig. Jeder Lehrer kann sie in eigener Verantwortung einsetzen. Sie nimmt auch sehr wenig Zeit in Anspruch, so dass sie keine Abstriche am Fachcurriculum not­wendig macht. Im Gegenteil, sie wirkt sich positiv auf die Lernmotivation der Schüler und das Lernklima in der Klasse aus. Eine Biologie­lehre­rin berichtet, dass ihre Klasse nach einer KMDD-Sitzung mit dem Stoff viel schneller durch war als sonst. Anders als früher hätten die Schüler nun mehr Fragen gestellt und mehr miteinander über das Ge­lernte diskutiert: „Sie wissen jetzt besser, wofür sie lernen“.

 

Literatur

Adler, Mortimer: A revolution in education. American Educator: The Professional Journal of the American Federation of Teachers, 6(4) 1982, 20-24.

Adorno, Theodor W., Frenkel-Brunswik, E., Levinson, D. J. & Sanford, N.: The authoritarian personality. New York, 1950.

Althof, Wolfgang: Just community sources and transformations: A conceptual archaeology of Kohlberg’s approach to moral and democratic education. In: B. Zizek, D. Garz & E. Nowak, Hg., Kohlberg revisited, 51-90. Sense, 2015.

Arendt, Hanna: Über das Böse. Eine Vorlesung zu Fragen der Ethik. München, 2007.

Bargel, Tino, Markiewicz, Władysław  & Peisert, Hansgert: University graduates: Study experi­ence and social role. Empirical findings of a comparative study in five European countries. In: M. Niessen & J. Pe­schar, Hg., Comparative research on education, 55-78. Oxford. 1982.

Berliner, David C. & Glass, Gene V. : Myths and lies that threaten America’s public schools. New York, 2014.

Blatt, Moshe & Kohlberg, Lawrence: The effect of classroom moral discussion upon children’s level of moral judgment. Journal of Moral, Education, 4, 1975, 129-161.

Comunian, Anna L. & Gielen, Uwe P.: Promotion of moral judgement maturity through stimu­lation of social role-taking and social reflection: an Italian intervention study. Journal of Moral Education, 35 (1), 2006, 51-69.

Darling-Hammond, Linda & Ancess, J.: Democracy and access to education. In: R. Soder, Hg., Democracy, education, and the schools, 151-181. San Francisco, 1996.

Hemmerling, Kay: Morality behind bars – An intervention study on fostering moral compe­tence of prisoners as a new approach to social rehabilitation. Frankfurt, 2015.

Jefferson, Thomas: Letters (arranged by W. Whitman). Eau Claire, WI, 1940.

Keasey, Charles B.: The influence of opinion-agreement and qualitative supportive reasoning in the evaluation of moral judgments. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 30, 1974, 477-482.

Kohlberg, Lawrence: Development of moral character and moral ideology. M. L. Hoffman & L. W. Hoff­man, Hg., Review of Child Development Research, Vol. I, 381-431. New York, 1964.

Lind, Georg: Measuring moral judgment: A review of ‘The measurement of moral judgment’ by Anne Colby and Lawrence Kohlberg. Human Development, 32, 1989, 388-397.

Lind, Georg: Ist Moral lehrbar? Ergebnisse der modernen moralpsychologischen Forschung. Berlin, 2002.

Lind, Georg: Jenseits von PISA — Für eine neue Evaluationskultur. In: Institut für Schul­ent­wick­lung, Hg., Standards, Evaluation und neue Methoden, 1-7. Baltmannsweiler, 2004.

Lind, Georg: Perspektive ‘Moralisches und demokratisches Lernen. In: A. Fritz, R. Klupsch-Sahl­mann & G. Ricken, Hg., Handbuch Kindheit und Schule. Neue Kindheit, neues Ler­nen, neuer Unter­richt, 296-309. Weinheim, 2006.

Lind, Georg: Amerika als Vorbild? Erwünschte und unerwünschte Folgen aus Evaluationen. In: T. Bohl & H. Kiper., Hg., Lernen aus Evaluationsergebnissen – Verbesserungen planen und im­ple­men­tieren, 63-81. Bad Heilbrunn, 2009.

Lind, Georg: Moral ist lehrbar. Wie man moralisch-demokratische Fähigkeiten fördern und damit Gewalt, Betrug und Macht mindern kann. Berlin, 2015.

Lind, Georg: Moralerziehung auf den Punkt gebracht. Bad Schwalbach, 2017a.

Lind, Georg: Soll die Schule Werte vermitteln oder Moralkompetenz fördern? Pädagogik, 12/17, 2017b, 34-37.

McFaul, Michael: Democracy promotion as a world value. The Washington Quarterly, 28 (1), 2004, 147-163.

Narvaez, Darcia: Moral text comprehension: implications for education and research. Journal of Moral Education, 30(1), 2001, 43-54.

Nowak, Ewa & Lind, Georg: Mis-educative martial law – The fate of free discourse and the moral judgment competence of Polish university students from 1977 to 1983. In: M. Zirk-Sa­dows­ki, B. Wojciechowski, & M. Golecki, Hg., Between complexity and chaos, S. 129-152. Torun, Polen, 2009.

Nowak, Ewa, Schrader, Dawn & Zizek, Boris, Hg.: Educating competencies for democracy. Frank­furt, 2013.

Piaget, J.: Das moralische Urteil beim Kinde. Frankfurt, 1973 (Original 1932).

Portele, G.: “Du sollst das wollen!” Zum Paradox der Sozialisation. In: G. Portele, Hg., Soziali­sation und Moral, 147-168. Weinheim, 1978.

Power, F. Clark, Higgins, Ann & Kohlberg, Lawrence: Lawrence Kohlberg’s approach to moral edu­cation. New York, 1989.

Ravitch, Diane: The death and life of the great American school system: How testing and choice are undermining education. New York, 2010.

Reinicke, Martina: Moralkompetenz 4.0. — eine Aufgabe der Schule? (Eigenverlag. Bestel­lung: m.reinicke@primacom.net, 2017).

Schillinger, Marcia: Learning environments and moral development: How university education fosters moral judgment competence in Brazil and two German-speaking countries. Aachen, 2006.

Sen, Amartya: Democracy as a universal value. Journal of Democracy, 10 (3), 1999, 3-17.

Speicher, Betsy: Family patterns of moral judgment during adolescence and early adulthood. Developmental Psychology, 30, 1994, 624-632.

Sjoberg, S.: PISA and ‘Real Life Challenge’: Mission impossible? In: S. T. Hopfmann et al., Hg., PISA zufolge PISA, 203-224. Berlin, 2007.

Tocqueville, Alexis de:. Über die Demokratie in Amerika. München, 1976 (Original 1835).

Walker, Lawrence J.: Sources of cognitive conflict for stage transition in moral development. Deve­lopmental Psychology, 19, 1983, 103-110.

Wasel, Wolfgang: Simulation moralischer Urteilsfähigkeit. Moralentwicklung: eine kognitiv-struk­­turelle Veränderung oder ein affektives Phänomen? Universität Konstanz, 1994.

Westheimer, Joel: Teaching for democratic action. Educação & Realidade, 40 (2), 2015, 465-483.

Dieser Artikel beruht auf meinem Beitrag

Lind, G. (2018). Moralerziehung. In: Johannes Drerup & Gottfried Schweiger, Hg.,: Handbuch Philosophie der Kindheit. Metzler-Verlag. (im Druck)

Moralische Kompetenz — Der Auftrag der Bildung in einer Demokratie

Georg Lind

Die fünf wichtigsten Ergebnisse aus 40 Jahren Forschung:

1.   Moralisch handeln ist schwer

Das Zusammenleben in einer Demokratie stellt hohe Anforderungen an die Moralkompetenz ihrer Bürger, dass ist, die Fähigkeit, Probleme und Konflikte auf der Grundlage moralischer Prinzipien durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere. Wir haben viel Freiheit, aber zu wenige haben die Fähigkeit, sie zu nutzen.

2.   Moralkompetenz muss sich entwickeln

Moralkompetenz ist nicht angeboren. Sie muss sich entwickeln, so dass jeder Bürger Probleme und Konflikte selbst oder gemeinsam mit Anderen lösen kann.

3.   Lerngelegenheiten sind entscheidend

Diese Entwicklung gelingt nur, wenn dem Bürger geeignete Gelegenheiten zur Erprobung seiner Moralkompetenz zur Verfügung stehen: Diese müssen herausfordern, dürfen aber nicht überfordern. Beim Fehlen geeigneter Gelegenheiten zum Lernen stagniert die Entwicklung der Moralkompetenz oder geht zurück.

4.   Wir haben heute eine effektive Förder-Methode

Die Konstanzer Methode der Dilemma-Diskussion (KMDD)® hat sich als eine sehr wirksame Methode zur Förderung von Moralkompetenz erwiesen. Sie ist nachhaltig und ihr Einsatz an wenige Voraussetzungen gebunden: Sie benötigt keine Änderung der Stundentafel oder des Schulsystems, aber …

5.   Eine gründliche Ausbildung der KMDD-Lehrer ist essentiell für die Wirkung der Methode.

Info über Training & Zertifizierung als KMDD-Lehrer: https://www.uni-konstanz.de/ag-moral/

 

Literatur

Lind, G. (2015). Moral ist lehrbar. Berlin: Logos.

Lind, G. (2016). How to Teach Morality. Promoting Deliberation and Discussion, Reducing Violence and Deceit. Berlin: Logos.

Lind. G. (2017). Moralerziehung auf den Punkt gebracht. Bad Schwalbach: Debus-Pädagogik.

Lind, G. (2017). Soll Schule Werte vermitteln oder Moralkompetenz fördern? Pädagogik, 12/17, 34-37.

KMDD Workshop-Seminar 2018 in Konstanz

Das friedliche Zusammenleben in einer Demokratie stellt an den Bürger hohe Anforderungen, höhrere als das Leben in einer Diktatur, in der man nur gehorchen können muss.  Gefordert ist vor allem die Fähigkeit, selbst Probleme und Konflikte auf der Grundlage von moralischen Prinzipien durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere.

Mit der Konstanzer Methode der Dilemma-Diskussion (KMDD)® kann man diese Fähigkeit — moralisch-demokratische Kompetenz – sehr effektiv und mit geringem zeitlichen Aufwand fördern, allerdings nur dann, wenn der Anwender der KMDD gründlich ausgebildet ist.

Zielgruppe: alle Menschen ab 8 Jahre. Die KMDD ist voll inklusiv. Sie ist für heterogene Gruppen, für alle Bildungsinstitutionen und für alle Ausbildungsgänge geeignet, auch für militärische Akademien (Innere Führung), Strafanstalten (Resozialisierung) und Seniorenheime (Vorsorge gegen Vereinsamung). Neuerdings ist die KMDD auch im öffentlichen Raum als Diskussions-Theater “Reden & Zuhören” gefragt. Die KMDD wird inzwischen in vielen anderen  Kulturen und Ländern eingesetzt (neben Deutschland auch in Brasilien, Chile, China, Kolumbien, Mexiko, Polen und in den USA).

Literatur

Programm: Im KMDD Workshop-Seminar werden die Anwendung der KMDD gezeigt und geübt, die theoretischen Grundlagen vermittelt sowie in die Methoden der Selbstevaluation mittels objektiver Tests und Beobachtungen eingeführt. Praktische Übungen (workshop) wechseln sich mit theoretischen Vorträgen und Diskussionen (Seminar) ab. Bereits vor Beginn der Veranstaltung sind ein paar kurze Aufgaben zu bearbeiten.

Teilnehmer: alle pädagogisch Tätigen mit einem pädagogischen Abschluss. Es können auch Studierende teilnehmen, die pädagogisch tätig werden wollen.

Das KMDD Workshop-Seminar ist Voraussetzung für die Teilnahme am KMDD-Trainingsprogramm und die Zertfizierung als “KMDD-Lehrer”.

Veranstalter, Anmeldung und Gebühren: vhs Landkreis Konstanz.

Durchführung: Dr. Dr. Georg Lind
apl. Professor em. an der Universität Konstanz, Diplom-Psychologe (Uni Heidelberg) und Entwickler der KMDD und des ersten objektiven Moralische Kompetenz-Tests (MKT).

E-Mail: konstanz@vhs-landkreis-konstanz.de

Ort: vhs, Katzgasse 7, 78462 Konstanz.

Zeit: 22. – 26. Mai 2018
Beginn: 22. Mai, Dienstag, 9.00 Uhr; Ende: 26, Mai, Samstag, 13.00 Uhr.

Hotels und Zimmervermittlung: http://www.konstanz-tourismus.de/
Es empfiehlt sich, früh die Übernachtungen zu buchen. Während des Kurses sind in Baden-Württemberg und einigen anderen Bundesländern Pfingstferien. Konstanz ist ein beliebter Ferienort.

What Makes the Difference?

(This psychological poem can also be used as a guess game. )

What are people with moral principles called who try to solve problems and conflicts  …

– through deliberation?a virtuous person,

– through discussion with others?a good citizen,

– through violence?a terrorist,

– through deceit?a demagogue,

– through bowing down to others?a blind follower of demagogues.

What makes the difference?

Answer: Their moral competence, that is, their ability to solve problems and conflicts on the basis of moral principles, but through thinking and discussion, instead of through violence, deceit, and bowing down to others.

Reference: Lind, G. (2016). How to teach morality. Promoting deliberation and discussion, reducing violence and deceit. Berlin: Logos.


(Dieses psychologische Gedicht kann auch als Ratespiel genutzt werden.)

Was macht den Unterschied?

Wie werden Leute mit Moralprinzipien genannt, die Probleme und Konflikte durch Mittel zu lösen versuchen wie…

  • durch Abwägen? — Tugendhafte Personen

  • durch Diskutieren mit Anderen? — Gute Bürger

  • durch Gewalt? — Terroristen

  • durch Täuschung? — Demagogen

  • durch Unterwerfung unter Andere? — Blinde Anhänger von Demagogen.

Was macht den Unterschied?

Anwort: Ihre Moralkompetenz, das ist ihre Fähigkeit, Probleme und Konflikte auf der Basis moralischer Prinzipien, aber durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt, Betrug oder Unterwerfung unter Andere.

Literatur: Lind, G. (2015). Moral ist lehrbar. Berlin: Logos.

(If you have a version of this poem in another language, you can add it as a comment.)

First life-time certificate as KMDD-Teacher awarded

I am very happy to say, that Martina Reinicke is the first person who has earned the life-long KMDD-Teacher certificate. She successfully completed her second, final training & certification program on July 16, 2017. This is, of course, also a great day for the KMDD and me.

Martina has been ethics-teacher for many years before she started her KMDD training with me. Compared to many other further learning programs, this training requires not only much time: a one-week workshop-seminar and several days of preparation; a training-on-the-job of at least 80 hours spread over three months including self-directed efficacy assessment, a “best-practice video,” and a documentary portfolio; plus a final KMDD-Teacher training similar to the first one with the additional requirement to write a 10-page theoretical paper on some aspects of the KMDD. This training requires most candidates also to re-assess their own teaching practice and their objectives, because the KMDD literally puts the learner into the center of all teaching efforts rather than the curriculum and testing standards: The teacher is to be quiet most of the time to allow for thinking and discussion of her students!

Martina was a good ethics teacher who loved her job. But she felt something was missing. So she took up this new challenge. She took up the KMDD training besides her full teaching load at her vocational school center in Saxony. At the end she did not just fulfill the requirements for a KMDD certificate but went far beyond it. Instead of the required small self-directed efficacy assessment, she submitted a full-fledged experiment with a complex design which allows us to get a deeper understanding of the conditions of an effective teaching. She submitted not only the required 10-page theory paper, but wrote a 50-page booklet: “Moral 4.0” in which she passes on her experiences and materials gained during her KMDD training — in a lively and colorful voice.

Her efforts do not only tell us much about her working spirit but also about the KMDD training program. Her start into the program, she told me once, was not easy because of the many new requirements of the KMDD certification: self-directed, experimental assessment of her teaching efficacy instead of a supervisor’s judgment; best-practice video instead of tests and essays as proof of achievement; focus on students instead of curriculum; allowing and estimating silence and thinking in the classroom; cooperating with a learning partner, etc.. Often she doubted whether she could make it. At one time she wrote jokingly that she hated me. But obviously there was something in the KMDD training program which provided an incentive for going on. I believe the decisive “something” was the question which participants get to hear during the KMDD training over and over again: What did you learn?

Teachers must always learn — about their students and their subject, but also about learning, and about teaching. Teachers need to keep learning in order to be a good role model for their students, too. If they stop learning, they will have no success and no fun anymore. Therefore, the last question in each assignment during the KMDD training is: What did you learn? The whole portfolio has as final requirement: Write on two pages: What have you learned during your training? Two pages? For most participants this limit is too tight, they say, because what they have learned does not fit on two pages. Martina needed almost seven pages.

I admit, Martina’s seven page summary of what she has learned during her three years of working with the KMDD as a trainee and a certification candidate, is the most competent and most readable summary of the KMDD that exists so far. Since I am the developer and trainer of the KMDD, this is not easy to admit for me. But I admit it also with some proudness. It is (almost) all that I ever wanted to achieve since I started doing research on moral competence development over 40 years ago as an experimental psychologist. Namely I wanted to turn the valuable research findings of many scholars in this field since Piaget and Kohlberg’s landmark works, into something useful for mankind. I say “almost” because one more step is needed. I still hope that sometime we will be able to establish a KMDD-Teacher trainer program in higher education so that the KMDD will stay when I go.

Martina’s reflection on her learning process is contained in her fine 50-page booklet “Moral 4.0 – eine Aufgabe der Schule?” (Morality 4.0 — a task for the school?). At the moment, it is available only in German and only directly from Martina:  m.reinicke@primacom.net. She is still looking for a publisher.

Congratulation, Martina !

Yours

Georg Lind

Martina’s blog

Flyer on the KMDD training and certification programs in Deutsch and in English.
List of certified KMDD-Teachers.

Next Moral Competence Symposium and Workshop in Poznan, Poland, September 2017.

Reviews and endorsements of my book: “How to Teach Morality

Democracy Requires Basic Moral-Democratic Competence of All

flag-USAEnglish
Democracy can work only, if all citizens have developed a certain ability to cope with problems and conflicts on the basis of moral principles through deliberation and discussion, instead of using violence and deceit, or bowing down to power.
Because most people lack natural opportunities for moral-democratic learning, formal education must provide them. [more]
(My translation)


If you send me a translation of the above original English quote in your native language I will publish it on this site. Before you send it, please let other native language speakers review it. Thank you! Send to: Georg.Lind@uni-konstanz.de

 

flag-GermanyGerman
Die Demokratie kann nur funktionieren, wenn alle Bürger eine gewisse Fähigkeit haben, Probleme und Konflikte auf der Grundlage von Moralprinzipien durch Denken und Diskussion zu lösen, statt durch Gewalt und Betrug oder durch Unterwerfung unter Macht.
Weil es den meisten Menschen an Gelegenheiten zum moralisch-demokratischen Lernen mangelt, muss formale Bildung sie bereitstellen. [mehr]

flag-SpainSpanish
La democracia sólo puede funcionar si todos los ciudadanos desarrollan cierta capacidad para enfrentarse a problemas y conflictos sobre la base de principios morales empleando la deliberación y la discusión, en lugar de usar la violencia y el engaño o inclinarse hacia el uso de la fuerza.
Debido a que la mayoría de las personas carecen de oportunidades naturales para el aprendizaje moral-democrático, la educación formal debería proporcionárselas. [mas]
(Translation by Ana Cameille and Juan Carlos Ruiz)

flag-swedenSwedish
Demokrati kan bara fungera om alla medborgare har utvecklat en viss förmåga att hantera problem och konflikter på grundval av moraliska principer genom övervägande och diskussion, i stället för att använda våld och bedrägeri, eller genom att böja sig för makten.
Eftersom de flesta saknar naturliga möjligheter till moral-demokratiskt lärande, måste formell utbildning ges till dem.
(Translation by Kerstin Weimer)

flag-portugalPortuguese
A democracia só pode funcionar se todos os cidadãos desenvolveram alguma capacidade de lidar com problemas e conflitos com base em princípios morais, através de deliberação e discussão, em vez de apelar para a violência e engano, ou para o poder.
Como a maioria das pessoas não têm oportunidades naturais para a aprendizagem moral-democrática, a educação formal deve fornecêla.
(Translation by Helvécio Neves Feitosa)

Romanian
Democrația poate funcționa doar dacă toți cetățenii și-au dezvoltat o anumită capacitate de a face față problemelor și conflictelor pe baza principiilor morale, prin deliberare și discuții, în loc să folosească violența și înșelăciunea sau să se încline în fața puterii.
Deoarece majoritatea oamenilor nu dispun de oportunități naturale pentru învățătura moral-democratică, educație formală este cea care trebuie să le-o ofere.
(Translation by Bogdan Popoveniuc)